National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB)

I consider myself an entrepreneur.  My business, Integra Business Systems, was incorporated in March, 1988.  Our slogan is “advancing the paperless office.”  We develop enterprise content management (ECM) software also known as document imaging, or the electronic file cabinet.  Our customers include financial institutions and the financial services industry.  Our customers eliminate paper by digitizing documents by scanning paper or capture and archive “born digital” documents. Born digital documents include Adobe Acrobat (PDF) documents, Word, Excel, Google Docs, email, etc… We have 30 employees and growing.  We are a private, closely held, self-funded small business.

I believe the freedom and the success small business owners are blessed with and enjoy here in the USA, is based on the entrepreneurial spirit; individuals driven by God, family and freedom, the foundation America.  I believe my business and thousands of small businesses like Integra, make up the heart and soul of our great country.

I also believe you get out, what you put into something.  I discovered the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) several years ago while I was stumbling through some of our Human Resource (HR) issues.  The NFIB Employee Handbook available to members, opened the door to our long-term association.

The NFIB became a reliable source of content related to the needs of a small business in areas to include HR, finances, sales and marketing, legal and regulatory issues.  Like all small businesses, all these areas are costly and difficult to navigate alone.  While I cannot advocate the NFIB as a replacement for professional consultation and their services, the NFIB serves as an affordable surrogate source and Garmin-like resource for small business.

I realize this sounds like a “paid ” endorsement.  The only shameless promotion here is my own.  In fact, any involvement you have or partake upon with the NFIB is entirely up to you.  Like I said, “You get out, what you put into something.”

NFIB President Dan Danner

Towards that end I want to share with you what I think this is the best and most timely message to the public with regard to understanding the plight of small business and the economy that anyone could have delivered to this president and the rest of the politico in DC.

There is so much smoke and mirrors coming from the media and the Obama administration with regard to small business, I just wish more media outlets would have published this message (follow the link) from Dan Danner, NFIB president.

Note:  Please help us get the good word out.  Share us on your favorite social media site and Stumble Upon.  Thanks.

Made in the USA

Made in the USA

Monday, October 19, 2009 at 9:16pm

“Made in the USA” isn’t about the Big 3 automakers…
It’s time to put the brakes on government spending. The road to recovery lies with the success of small businesses, not with behemoth car companies and big labor. If we were going to bailout anyone, we should have bailed out the car dealerships and auto supply companies to allow them to remarket, retool and invest in new technologies. We should be growing our tax base, which is only going to happen if we fuel the small business private sector. Speaking of which, why are we not doing more to grow and keep promising small business technology companies and their technology jobs in the USA, where our best talent and our best jobs can remain right here at home?

“You will find men who want to be carried on the shoulders of others, who think that the world owes them a living. They don’t seem to see that we must all lift together and pull together.”    Henry Ford

We have Bill Gates and Microsoft, Larry Ellison and Oracle; and Eric Schmidt and Google, not to mention a plethora of phenomenal technology and software companies that started from nothing and today generate thousands upon thousands of high paying private sector jobs and tax revenues, all “Made in the USA.”

What’s more, most technology companies, in particular software companies, do little to harm our ecology (true green); they do not tax our ports, our roads, our bridges or our rail. This reduces our carbon footprint, while not adding to the tremendous and costly burden on the seemingly never ending and costly construction of our roads and our beleaguered transportation infrastructure.

Competition is increasing dramatically from foreign countries who wish to attract our talent, both foreign and domestic grads educated here in the USA, many getting their higher education with the help of US taxpayer dollars. The number of “propeller heads”, a.k.a., the savvy entrepreneurs and highly skilled workers “Made in the USA”, are leaving for a more favorable business climate or jobs overseas.

Our foreign competitors are offering much lower tax rates and hundreds of thousands of dollars in incentives to technology business startups and to their highly paid – highly skilled employees. They are advertising a better quality of life, improved infrastructure and a lower cost of living. Our foreign competitors recognize what we increasingly take for granted, which is the huge tax and revenue potential from small business startups, in particular in the technology field; with their disproportionally high numbers and high salaries as it pertains to job creation. This is coupled with the minimal impact on their country’s costly transportation  infrastructure.

The now and next generation of Bill Gates’, Larry Emerson’s and Eric Schmidt’s may find our politics too ambiguous, too costly and too unimaginative to breed success here in the USA. There are hundreds of thousands of small businesses and entrepreneurs right now who are losing the battle against a poor economy accentuated by high taxes and ever increasing regulation. There are hundreds of thousands of entrepreneurial ventures not even born yet that will never pass the incubation period.

Where should we, the United States of America, concentrate our efforts to keep our existing technology gurus and attract the next generation of “byte heads?” We need to provide education and programs that offer immediate and future tax relief to small businesses and their employees, like a payroll tax holiday. To do this we need to elect government representatives who want less government, who do less for Wall Street, who care less about big government and big union.

We need tech savvy, forward thinking, feet on the ground, “been there, done that” politicians who have missed a few paychecks like the rest of us and who want to do more for small businesses and the working class. Get started by offering existing small businesses and their employees, tax relief with a payroll tax holiday of 6 months or more. Offer new business start-ups, especially technology and software businesses who are Made in the USA and who are 1) less impactful on our transportation infrastructure; 2) provide green technologies; and 3) provide the high end wage earners, which is our future tax base, lower taxes and less government to stay and grow their businesses here in the USA.

“What’s right about America is that although we have a mess of problems, we have great capacity – intellect and resources – to do some thing about them.”
Henry Ford

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