Rejection wasn’t my strong suit!

The difference between Fred and myself?
Fred knew when he was lying.

My first job out of college was to work for ACME Forms.  My Dad owned ACME. Dad was the only full-time employee.   Business was good.

I joined my Dad as a sales rep in 1974. We were a force of two.  My Mom was the part time administrative support person and the mother of six.   I was the future.   It was a shaky start.  My job was to get new business.  I used the phone to solicit appointments.  I can remember my voice quaked and my message was ill-prepared.  After exhausting all legitimate leads I was proffered, by phone, I hit the road.

My first cold call, “cold “ being the vernacular used for an unsolicited visit on an unsuspecting business to make a sales pitch.  I was a major contributors as to why there are so many “No Solicitors” sign on doors.

Like the polyester plaid I was wearing, rejection isn’t my strong suit.  I have to admit there were days I could not face the day ahead without becoming physically ill, cramps and vomiting, anticipating the rejection that inevitably lay ahead.

For better or worse, most of the businesses I “solicited” on the south side of Chicago, were unaccustomed to a 21 year old young man in polyester and a “pleather” briefcase showing up at their door.  My first “sales call” and I use the term loosely, required considerable surveillance.  I drove around the block several times. In the end, it was a relief to just to be dismissed.  To hear a simple “no thanks” was a victory, of sort.  I had broken the sound barrier.  I had made contact with the other side.  Soon, I was making 20 cold calls in a day.

Thankfully gas was 30 cents a gallon!  My father would get a call from someone I had visited and he would say, “Yes, that’s my son, he’s like manure, he’s spread all over the place.”  The message was loud and clear, I needed to take the next step, get to the next level.

Speaking of manure, here’s a great joke from Ronald Reagan, only takes a minute, during one of his speeches.  Precious really.  Good clean fun!

I needed to convince my prospects I wasn’t just another pretty face in plaid polyester.  My contacts were bewildered, annoyed, amused, indifferent or thankfully, on rare occasion, sympathetic to my pitch.  It’s simply amazing.  I became accustomed to the word“no”.   I managed to solicit a cadre of variations   theme to the extent I began to expect and anticipate the response.  I learned to take a “no” and solicit another.  As my skin thickened and the manure piled higher, I was able to garner a “maybe” here and there and occasionally a yes!  It was the “ying and the yang” thing, “Yes means No” to the extent a Tibetan monk would have been proud.

Later, as a regional director at a large corp. at the sage age of 28 years, where I managed more than 70 neophyte sales reps in 10 states, I became well known for the expression, “lose more orders”.  My mantra was the more orders you lose, the more opportunities you have to win.  Spread that manure!  Well not exactly…

Anyway, my dad fired me.  he put me out of my misery!  His too.  He said I needed more experience.  He was right.  I was keeping him too busy  spinning his wheels.  At the time, I was devastated.  I finished the blueberry pancakes my Mom had made me.  I left town to seek employment.  I stayed with the in-laws while looking for work.

I painted their house for $70 bucks, but I painted their windows shut, so we were even.  I found a job right before I was evicted.  But there’s more to the story…

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Employee Benefits Statement

Benefits Statement

Employee Benefits StatementWe leave statutory benefits out of the equation, so as not to over inflate the benefits, but feel free to add them or change the spreadsheet in any fashion you wish. In our business, which is software development and technology we compete in a hi-tech salary + benefits world.  We have a profit sharing plan.

We also have a Work From Home Wednesdays program for employees who commute over 30 minutes from home (We dictate only Wednesday’s so they don’t try to make a long weekend out of it).

We even have a company gym in our Admin Building and Meeting Center.800 gym

If you would like a copy, subscribe and leave me a comment below and I will send you a sample Excel spreadsheet.

Broken Hearted

Recently, a dear friend’s mother passed away at 93 years of age.  More than a lifetime, yet only a moment in time.  Where do we go from here?  When the light goes out and the smile fades away of another loved one?

Aged and revered.  Adored and adulated.  Respected and to whatever degree possible, emulated.  You have to wonder how you can replace a legacy, an individual with such an enormous history; with another, a light so bright, here today, gone tomorrow.

In years past, there was the love and dedication to one another that reaches far beyond what has become practice today.  Our sovereign past was punctuated with marriages that endured 30, 40, 50 years and more.  When I say endured, I mean marriages suffered financial hardships far greater than we face today, unborn children, children suffering physical and mental handicaps and many other maladies we no longer face today.

Today, marriage is commonplace if not convenient.  The slightest hiccup is grounds for divorce.

Today, whether by a barrage of socio-economic altered DNA or as I would prefer to define it, our progeny are spoiled, people no longer live for one another, unless it is better suited (in our best interest) to do so.

There is a commitment to convenience.  Principles are defined by rule of law and politics as opposed to personal ethics and spirituality.

Formal education today has schooled us in cynicism and prejudice against a society built on “sweat equity” and capitalist ideals.  Today our future is in hands unsoiled by the earth and unscathed by the tools that built our rails, roads and bridges that made our country great.  God help us.

In the book Unbroken, by Laura Hillenbrand, a story unfolds about a man, Louis Zamperini, a WWII hero who endured (there’s that word again), along with thousands of WWII prisoners of war and victims of Japanese imposed terror, torture and genocide, unspeakable crimes against human nature and survived to become a true American hero.  If you read his story you will come to realize, the use of the term “hero” today is used at a whole different level.

The book is a best seller.  People marvel over the fortitude and unrelenting willfulness of a man to do what’s right in the face of sheer evil.  Louis Zamperini and hundreds of thousands of Americans of his era were doing what they thought was the right thing to do.  Let’s hope that spirit of America doesn’t die!

I don’t wish to diminish simple acts of bravery, or people doing the right thing when faced with a choice.  My problem is it has become unexpected and uncommon to do what’s morally and ethically responsible in the face of popular alternative.  And God forbid you’ll get sued!

Now it’s time to get off my soapbox and on my knees.  It’s time to give thanks to God for the bright lights and great minds that will outlive the memories of most.  God rest your soul.

You’re fired!

Donald Trump may have fired and missed on Obama’s birth certificate but he’s dead on when it comes to the billions of taxpayer dollars filling the coffers of our enemies.

US taxpayers have little or no control over the decisions made by our government to spend billions to placate foreign governments with little or no accountability.

It’s time to pull the plug on US taxpayer money to the tune of 3 billion a year going to the Pakistanis.  At the very least its time to hold them
accountable.  Pay for play.  Is that so unreasonable?

Who knows whether the money is going to military operations to defeat Al Qaeda or the Taliban or for personal enrichment, in particular government or military officials responsible for hiding bin Laden.

Shaun Gregory, director of the Pakistan Security Research Unit at Britain’s University of Bradford, says it is inconceivable that Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence directorate, the ISI, did not know bin Laden was there. “Is it really believable that this famous guy, [nearly 2 meters tall], moves around and manages to evade the United States for 10 years and the ISI, if we’re to believe that they’re hunting him? I think the answer to that is no,” he said.

Then there’s the question of double-dipping.  Powerful and influential Pakistanis not only control the purse strings, they have figured out how to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.

But even if the ISI was aiding certain groups, it was widely assumed it would not protect the world’s most wanted man. However, Shaun Gregory says Osama bin Laden, a Saudi by birth, had powerful backers in his ancestral homeland. “You mustn’t lose sight of the relationship between rich and powerful Saudis and rich and powerful people in Pakistan, including in the military. There’s a whole sort of clandestine network here and relationship here that we simply don’t see in the Western media, that the Saudis give vast amounts of money to Pakistanis for certain things. My understanding is that Raymond Davis, for example, the blood money that was paid for him was paid by the Saudis. I think there’s some very powerful interests in Saudi that wanted to keep bin Laden safe,” he said.

In the case of the Pakistanis a refund of great magnitude is due.  Let’s not pussy foot around,  If Pakistan won’t play our game, there’s always India.  India may be stealing our jobs but they’re not taking American lives!

Let’s just do what’s right.  Go with your gut.  Sometimes it’s just that simple.  No more aid and comfort to the enemy.  Time to reinvest in America!

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