Gay Rights, The Affordable Care Act and This Bald Eagle

11390065_1620299788225300_8909913669019005123_nThis latest meme (left) from Obama supporters is special… I say congrats to the classless Obama supporters.

Gay rights? It was happening state by state to its logical conclusion anyway. Meh… No need for the heavy hand of the SCOTUS. Personally. I’m going to miss the parades.

Those applauding our SCOTUS and the POTUS, obviously don’t run a small business or care about what’s really going down.

There are more families today in poverty than when Obama took office 7 years ago (5.5 Million more). This despite more jobs. Obviously more jobs means LOWER paying jobs.

The federal debt owed to the public has more than DOUBLED under Obama, rising by 103 percent. Nothing to gloat about.

You can high-five the employment numbers all you want, but the costs are high. I fear, for my children’s future, which is Greece. There are more people insured under Obamacare, but the cost is high. Most are subsidized or on Medicaid and the costs are unsustainable. Who gets hurt, small business and the middle class.

A case in point… we have 42 employees. We pay 100% of our employees health and dental benefits. Since the ACA was enacted, despite submitting to higher deductibles every year, our premiums have risen over 30%, 12 1/2 percent this year alone. Consider the competition is going from five major carriers to three, the future is not bright for small business healthcare cost. Just the facts.

I’d say this bald eagle is more a symbol of an endangered species, small business, rather than a symbol of America’s greatness. High fives all around to the Obama supporters!

Why I hit the Lottery…

Lottery-winner_parking_spots_at_the_Atlantic_Lottery_Corporation_(2009)I’ve hit the lottery (see below), but not for the reasons to which our President and his heir apparent, Hillary Clinton espouses. I’m a small business owner. I started a business 27 years ago and we’re still here. According to the president, it must be dumb luck!

The president thinks hard working people who make a lot of money have won the lottery. Obama says, “If we can’t ask for society’s lottery winners for that modest contribution, then really this conversation is all for show,” he told the Catholic-Evangelical Leadership Summit.

This latest on successful businesses, coupled with Obama’s well worn rhetoric, “If you’ve got a business, you didn’t build that. Somebody else made that happen.” referring to private businesses being dependent of big government is daunting to hard working small business owners, to say the least.

Why I hit the Lottery…

I want to get up in the morning.

I have a spouse and family whom I love and they love me.

Through hard work and healthy living we are well and we want for nothing.

I am a Christian, There is a God. I have my faith.

I’m living free, in the greatest country in the world, the United States of America.

I find great joy in giving generously, to charities and other great causes.

I’m proud of my accomplishments. Like most small business owners, I create and grow good paying jobs.

I believe in the human spirit and American exceptionalism. Despite many setbacks over time, there have been more wins.

I believe most people are inherently good.

Job creators, entrepreneurs, and business owners who are successful should not be demeaned by our President. He implicitly associates success with the cause for income inequality and racism.

In a Forbes article as a point of reference, it says small, entrepreneurial firms account for two-thirds of the job creation in the economy. Venture-backed firms contribute 11% of U.S. private sector jobs and 21% of GDP, and high-tech firms are a mainstay of U.S. exports.

As a taxpayer, I’d be much more receptive to Obama’s argument if there wasn’t so much wasteful spending, abuse of power, and inequity in big government. Pick your department. Start with the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Government Logic

Who's on First?

Who’s on First?

Email “Understanding unemployment” Author Unknown

COSTELLO: I  want to talk about the unemployment rate in America

ABBOTT: Good Subject.  Terrible Times. It’s 7.8%.

COSTELLO:  That many people are out of work?

ABBOTT: No,  that’s 14.7%.

COSTELLO: You just said 7.8%.

ABBOTT:  7.8% Unemployed.

COSTELLO:  Right 7.8% out of work.

ABBOTT: No, that’s 14.7%.

COSTELLO:  Okay, so it’s 14.7% unemployed.

ABBOTT: No, that’s 7.8%.

COSTELLO:  WAIT A MINUTE.  Is it 7.8% or 14.7%?

ABBOTT: 7.8%  are unemployed. 14.7% are out of work.

COSTELLO: If  you are out of work you are unemployed.

ABBOTT: No,  Congress said you can’t count the “Out of  Work” as the unemployed.  You have to look for work to be unemployed.

COSTELLO: BUT THEY ARE OUT OF WORK!!!

ABBOTT: No, you miss his point.

COSTELLO:   What point?

ABBOTT:  Someone who doesn’t look for work can’t be counted with those who look for work. It wouldn’t be fair.

COSTELLO: To whom?

ABBOTT: The unemployed.

COSTELLO: But ALL of them are out of work.

ABBOTT: No, the unemployed are actively looking for work. Those who are out of work gave up looking and if you give up, you are no longer in the ranks of the unemployed.

COSTELLO: So if you’re off the unemployment roles that would count as less unemployment?

ABBOTT:  Unemployment would go down. Absolutely!

COSTELLO: The unemployment  just goes down because you don’t look for work?

ABBOTT:   Absolutely it goes down. That’s how it gets to 7.8%. Otherwise it would be 14.7%.

COSTELLO:  Wait, I got a question for you. That means there are two ways to bring down the unemployment number?

ABBOTT: Two ways is correct.

COSTELLO:   Unemployment can go down if someone gets a job?

ABBOTT:   Correct.

COSTELLO: And unemployment can also go down if  you stop looking for a job?

ABBOTT:  Bingo.

COSTELLO: So there are two ways to bring unemployment down, and the easier of the two is to have people stop looking for  work.

ABBOTT: Now you’re thinking like an economist.

COSTELLO: I  don’t even know what the hell I just said!

ABBOTT: Now you’re thinking like a politician.

In Life Too Often, It’s the Tail Waggin’ the Dog

100_0003 (2)I love the beat of Cody’s tail wagging against the floor, against the door, against the wall, against the bed he is lying on.  I’m not sure whether it will be Cody’s heart that gives out before his tail stops wagging.

Cody’s my 10 year old chocolate lab.  We’re kinda attached at the hips.  He goes to work with me every day.  He goes to work most days, I am out of town on business. I now have a ramp he uses to load up into the back of my SUV.  It is a ceremony.  He’s not fan of the trip up.  I’ve employed what is best to describe as a soft suitcase I wrap him in, to coax him up the ramp.  He’s frantic, so there’s always a treat waiting for him.  Upon arrival, and his descent, he reminds me of an arriving dignitary, including the obligatory pause for photo ops, before his parade trip down the ramp.

Cody knows when it’s time to go to work.  He knows when it is time for his 10 and 4 o’clock walks.  He knows he goes to North Park in the AM and he knows he tours the office park in the afternoon.

Most important he knows when it is time to go home.  Dinner!

If you ask him to change his routine, you meet with the stubbornness of a 100+ lb. dog, who knows who’s in charge.

He knows when the UPS truck arrives.  He knows the drivers.  He knows whether to expect a biscuit or a good rub.  The drivers know him, too.  After all, “What can brown do for you?”

You might say Cody has it made.  Even before you see his beds at home or the leather sofa he spends an increasing amount of time on at the office, but there’s a point to all this dribble. So bear with me.

Cody’s hips are giving in to father time, so he’s getting laser to strengthen his shoulders and flanks.  If it works for him, I’m next in line.

Cody now goes to bed before Terri and I do.  Both of us cracked a smile and laughed the first time he left us to head for bed.  Now we know Cody has more common sense than we do.

A former neighboring business owner had a 10 year old white lab named Jack.  Like Cody, he came to work with his owners each day.  Jack died suddenly.  We were commiserating when Jack’s owner said to me, “give Cody a good back scratch for Jack.”

When I scramble to meet a deadline, decry the political theatre, grouse over a lost order or worry about where the next dollar is coming from, all I have to do is look to my friend.  He’s most often at my feet.

I am reminded.  I have so much to live for, why not make things right in this messed up world?  The solution?

Everyone should get a good tummy rub and a nice back scratch every day.  Cody does.

In Life Too Often, It’s the Tail Waggin’ the Dog

100_0003 (2)

Cody as a puppy with my wife Terri

I love the beat of Cody’s tail wagging against the floor, against the door, against the wall, against the bed he is lying on.  I’m not sure whether it will be Cody’s heart that gives out before his tail stops wagging. 

Cody’s my 10 year old chocolate lab.  We’re kinda attached at the hips.  He goes to work with me every day.  He goes to work most days, I am out of town on business. I now have a ramp he uses to load up into the back of my SUV.  It is a ceremony.  He’s not fan of the trip up.  I’ve employed what is best to describe as a soft suitcase I wrap him in, to coax him up the ramp.  He’s frantic, so there’s always a treat waiting for him.  Upon arrival, and his descent, he reminds me of an arriving dignitary, including the obligatory pause for photo ops, before his parade trip down the ramp.

Cody knows when it’s time to go to work.  He knows when it is time for his 10 and 4 o’clock walks.  He knows he goes to North Park in the AM and he knows he tours the office park in the afternoon.

Most important he knows when it is time to go home.  Dinner!

If you ask him to change his routine, you meet with the stubbornness of a 100+ lb. dog, who knows who’s in charge.

He knows when the UPS truck arrives.  He knows the drivers.  He knows whether to expect a biscuit or a good rub.  The drivers know him, too.  After all, “What can brown do for you?”

You might say Cody has it made.  Even before you see his beds at home or the leather sofa he spends an increasing amount of time on at the office, but there’s a point to all this dribble. So bear with me.

Cody’s hips are giving in to father time, so he’s getting laser to strengthen his shoulders and flanks.  If it works for him, I’m next in line.

Cody now goes to bed before Terri and I do.  Both of us cracked a smile and laughed the first time he left us to head for bed.  Now we know Cody has more common sense than we do.

A former neighboring business owner had a 10 year old white lab named Jack.  Like Cody, he came to work with his owners each day.  Jack died suddenly.  We were commiserating when Jack’s owner said to me, “give Cody a good back scratch for Jack.”

When I scramble to meet a deadline, decry the political theatre, grouse over a lost order or worry about where the next dollar is coming from, all I have to do is look to my friend.  He’s most often at my feet.

I am reminded.  I have so much to live for, why not make things right in this messed up world?  The solution?

Everyone should get a good tummy rub and a nice back scratch every day.  Cody does.

Why in the World Would You Build a Small Business!?

Small business owners

Small business owners

The ideacapitalist interviews… the ideacapitalist, family guy, entrepreneur and small business owner.

How did you become a small business owner, and why?

The simplest answer would be, no one would hire me.  My first job out of school was working for my dad.  Nine months later, my dad fired me.  I knew it was coming.  My dad ran the business out of the house.  That morning my mom had made me my favorite breakfast, blueberry pancakes. 

Thereafter, I have had successful stints with large and mid-size companies, but there’s only so much a person will do for money.  I had reached my limit.

What do you love the most about running a small business?

Gainfully employing good people.  Growing the business.  Being more innovative and responsive than our larger competitors and winning.

What does owning a business allow you to do that most folks do not get to enjoy?

This question has the potential to be long on clichés, but the right answer is that I never have to think twice about getting out of bed in the morning.

What is your biggest challenge right now and how are you dealing with it?

Ok, now it’s time for a clichés.  My favorite expression is from Alan Kay, “The best way to predict the future is to invent it.” In the software development (technology) business we are reminded of this expression daily.  We have to constantly reinvent ourselves.

What has been your proudest moment as a small business owner?

I’m going to equate pride with reward and say my most rewarding moment was when an employee, I held in high regard, walked into my office, and stuck out his hand.  We shook hands and I asked him, “What is this all about?”  He said, “You promised me within five years, I would be making “x-amount” of dollars per year and I am.  Thanks.” 

My proudest moment was March 7, 2013 when we celebrated 25 years in business.

What have you not yet achieved that you would like to?

I’m not a “bucket list” kind of guy.  Certainly I have revenue goals and long-term objectives for the business.  Call it 20/20, annual twenty (20) percent growth in both revenue and profit.  The real challenge is balancing the physical challenges with the mental challenges.  Next year, I’m looking forward to both cross-country skiing and cycling around Crater Lake.

What is the best part of your day?

Getting out on my bike for an hour or two in the middle of a work day, and not getting run over.

What do you read?

I’m reading an amazing, gut-wrenching, inspirational story of personal struggle and entrepreneurship titled Born to Rise: A Story of Children and Teachers Reaching Their Highest Potential by Deborah Kenney

What has been your biggest mistake and how did you learn from it?

I’ve made many. I’m going to make many more.  My biggest mistake would be not to learn from them. 

EntrepreNever

If it takes you 27 years of sweat equity running a ‪small business to make it into the 1% don’t you think there should be a waiver from the Obama administration on his tax on everyone who makes $250,000 or more?

There are waivers for Big Union and Big Business for Obamacare.

  small business  owner is a community organizer too, only he’s not spending other people’s money.

After all, a small business reports income taxes on what the business makes and then must determine how much of that income has to go back into the business for the business to survive and grow.

Why should Obama decide how many employees I should hire?  Why should he decide how much we decide to invest in new and existing products and services to survive or grow?

 

 

 

 

 

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