Money and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria

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Follow the money to stop ISIS. Focus on where the money is coming from (did I mention the Saudis?) that fund ISIS. All the more reason for the U.S. to frack away.  Every day we pay at the pump, we’re feeding the hand that bites us and kills innocents.  While the people who support ISIS have blood on their hands, we’re losing our souls.  ISIS has killed thousands of people, many helpless unarmed civilians,  The question should be asked, “What would happen tomorrow if we stopped buying Arab oil?”  If POTUS isn’t going to do anything about it, don’t we know best how to hit them where it hurts?  The pocketbook.  Stop funding ISIS. Why not boycott Arab oil?

Money Jihad

In 2007, the Islamic State of Iraq was seen as “the richest of the insurgency groups” in Iraq with $1 billion to 1.5 billion “collected in revenue by the group through foreign donations, enforced taxation and confiscation of the property and funds of Iraqis.” But the U.S. surge and ISI missteps significantly damaged the jihadist group’s ability to raise funds.

Seven years and three names later, ISIS amassed a $2 billion comeback and took control of large swathes of territory in northern Iraq including Mosul and 35 percent of Syria.

ISIS’s financial recovery has been marked by a slight shift away from reliance on local extortion networks (although those are still in effect), improved organizational and financial management by ISIS leader and self-proclaimed caliph Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, and the departure of U.S. troops in 2011.

The most important elements of ISIS’s funding are sadaqa (voluntary donations) from Arab…

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About Idea Capitalist
Family guy and entrepreneur. Small Business owner. NFIB Leadership Council member. Serial blogger.

One Response to Money and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria

  1. Pingback: Dabiq: What Islamic State’s New Magazine Tells Us about Their Strategic Direction, Recruitment Patterns and Guerrilla Doctrine | The Osint Journal Review

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